We are young storytellers of color who use media as a force for social change.

WHO WE ARE

Content By Us is an awareness campaign created by and for young content creators of color who use digital media and art as a revolutionary tool. Using the power of our digital platforms, Content By Us vigorously advocates for the media itself to represent and elevate the diverse narratives across the United States.

RECENT HIGHLIGHTS

in the month of May, some artists in the Youth Creator Network contributed to a collaborative project showcasing what mental health means to them.

🎨: @vhs_nas calls this piece “go brain go”, which “shows the importance of supporting your mind’s health.

mental health is... a very important part of this human experience, so it’s best to support in any way possible.”

Hella Creative, a small collective of Black artists and creative professionals in the Bay Area, has been lobbying companies over the past year to give employees the day off on Juneteenth as part of their campaign to educate the public about the holiday.⠀

their efforts have paid off, ...and more than 800 companies have since pledged to make Juneteenth a paid holiday for workers. ⠀

according to Quinnton Harris, one of the creatives who launched Hella Creative, “The origins of the campaign came out of a desire to create a space for joy in the Black community.”

happy fridayyyy 🤗 video creators, it's time for y'all to introduce yourselves and tag each other in the comments! give us some vids to binge this weekend 👀

calling all Youth Creator Network members 🗣 we hope y’all can join us at our hangout next week on Thursday, June 24! it’ll be a great time to kick back and get to know each other ✨⠀

check the member dashboard for more details! we’ll see y’all there 💜

in case y’all needed any recs, here are some of the shows, books, and artists that we’ve been loving over here at the Youth Creator Network lately ✨

have y’all heard of any of these? tell us ur thoughts down below! (no spoilers tho 👀) ⬇️

in the month of May, some artists in the Youth Creator Network contributed to a collaborative project showcasing what mental health means to them. we’ll be sharing some of their work on here in the coming days!

🎨: @tori.liberty describes her piece above as “a fantasy inspired self ...portrait to help cope with gender dysphoria… It helps me a lot to draw myself really exaggerated so I have control over my own self image….

This piece describes my mental health by using coping skills of dressing up and diving into a false reality that displays my artistic expression.”

happy friday 🗣🗣 poets, it’s time for y’all to introduce yourselves in the comments, and tag any other poets yk!

📣 we’re accepting art & content submissions for our #FridaysByUs creative series! we’re calling for visual arts, skits, fashion, poetry, and even health and wellness content — all accepted applicants will receive a $50 gift card and will be credited and tagged in every post that ...features their work.

➡️ sign up to be featured today: apply at youthcreator.network/links ✨

in honor of both AAPI Heritage Month and Mental Health Awareness Month in May, we commissioned some creators from the Youth Creator Network to create art on mental health in AAPI communities.

Youth Creator Network’s own @cdinhart had this to say about her piece, pictured above: “There... are many reasons why AAPI individuals hesitate to reach out about their mental health—inaccessible mental health services, perhaps, or a lacking support network, or pressure to manage our struggles on our own. Talking about mental health still feels, to me, like making calls with a telephone cable held together by electrical tape. Can anyone hear you? AAPI individuals are 3 times less likely to reach out about mental health than their white counterparts. To overturn the stigma of mental health in our communities, to open doors to accessible and multilingual mental health services, to reach out—would save lives.”

🎨: @cdinhart

in honor of both AAPI Heritage Month and Mental Health Awareness Month in May, we commissioned some creators from the Youth Creator Network to create art based on mental health in AAPI communities.

Youth Creator Network’s own @skullgod_hira had this to say about his piece, pictured ...above: “This should be interpreted as its barest meaning; halves. Whether we are half loved, half Asian, torn in half by our communities and our people, we stay whole. I myself am not whole in regards to my identity, but I have loyalty to my roots. There should never be a choice between respect and dignity. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders should be given their basic respect as citizens on U.S. soil, none of us should have to choose to adhere to explicit racism and stereotypes just to be seen as a "model minority" or even a regular person. We deserve respect no matter how different our culture or appearance may be. We deserve respect."

🎨: @skullgod_hira

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